Posts Tagged ‘linux’

Father of Social Networking worms (Koobface) comes to Linux and Mac OS X via Java

The Bad

On social networking sites like Twitter, Facebook and MySpace, if someone says to you ”Is it you in this video?,” be warned, because in reality, it leads to a fake YouTube page with a thumbnail which when clicked checks you OS version, downloads a Java applet called jnana.tsa on Linux and exploits a Remote Code Execution vulnerability in outdated versions of Java. Once installed on a computer, the worm hijacks the social networking accounts of its owner and uses them to propagate.

The Good

The applet is dropped inside the user’s home directory and stops running at computer reboot. This means that on Linux, unlike on Windows, the Koobface infections are temporary. Which means if you happen to get that infection,  reboot immediately.

The Ugly

This shows that Linux and Mac OS X users aren’t vulnerable to malware, as their market share increases they will become an attractive target for social networking worms like Koobface.

via Softpedia

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How To | New fix for Ubuntu Plymouth

Plymouth Ubuntu

I’ve talked about this in the past, but with this release of Ubuntu 10.10 I thought it would be a good idea to bring this up again. Thanks to Webupd8 for putting together a post for an even simpler fix for this.

Fix The Ubuntu Plymouth with proprietary Nvidia or ATI graphics drivers

Warning: use it at your own risk! Only use this script if you know your way on the command line and can revert everything manually in case something goes wrong. I’ve used it to fix the Plymouth on Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat (with proprietary Nvidia graphics drivers) but I cannot guarantee it will also work for you (and that it won’t break stuff). The script should work with both Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx and Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat.

To fix Plymouth, run the following commands (will download and run the script):
cd
wget http://launchpadlibrarian.net/57638460/fixplymouth
chmod +x fixplymouth
./fixplymouth

Or you can manually download the script from HERE.

Warning: only run the script once!

Fix plymouth script

After running it, the script will display a list of screen resolutions supported by Plymouth (specific for your computer). Enter the best resolution from the list displayed by the script under the following format: 1024×768-24 (this is just an example)! This is the only difference between this script and Kyleabaker’s script (in which you had edit the script with your Plymouth screen resolution and most people never knew what’s the maximum resolution supported by Plymouth for their computers).

If hwinfo (which is automatically ran by the script) doesn’t display the supported resolutions for your monitor, see the second solution from HERE.

Revert the changes made by this script

All the changes made by this script can be reverted using kyleabaker’s revert script. There is a download link at the end of THIS post.
Credits for the script in this post: d0rkye and kyleabaker.

We > 1%

A new ‘Linux counter’ initiative that aims to disprove press claims than Linux is used by less than 1% of the world’s desktop computer users has been launched.

Current estimates of worldwide Linux usage by StatCounter pin it a 0.77% share over the last 12 months, and a slightly lower figure of 0.75% since they began taking records.

Oddly, Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer has often contested this view stating that he suspects Linux market share is in fact greater than that of Mac OS X.

Whatever the truth you can willingly add your voice to the noble-project  over at http://www.dudalibre.com/gnulinuxcounter?lang=en

A new ‘Linux counter’ initiative that aims to disprove press claims than Linux is used by less than 1% of the worlds desktop computer users has been launched.

Current estimates of worldwide Linux usage by StatCounter pin it a 0.77% share over the last 12 months, and a slightly lower figure of 0.75% since they began taking records.

Oddly, Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer has often contested this view stating that he suspects Linux market share is in fact greater than that of Mac OS X.

Whatever the truth you can willingly add your voice to the noble-project  over @ dudalibre.com/gnulinuxcounter

Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat Release Candidate now available for download

It may not be the official release day yet, but Ubuntu 10.10 Release Candidate is now available for download. The release can be downloaded from releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/ or using the direct links below.

What’s new

New features, updates and changes from the Beta release last month:

Downloads

Be sure to verify the MD5SUMS before burning your LiveCD!! How to check your MD5SUMS…

List of MD5SUMS can be found here: http://releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/MD5SUMS

Ubuntu 10.10 Desktop

These are the links for the LiveCD .iso. Where possible try to use BitTorrent for downloading as not only will you get it faster so will everyone else!

Ubuntu 10.10 Alternate

The alternate install CD allows you to perform certain specialist installations of Ubuntu.

Ubuntu Netbook Edition

The netbook .iso can be installed to a USB for drive-less installation using the USB Startup tool that Ubuntu ships with.

Ubuntu 10.10 Server

 

 

Thanks to WebUpd8 for this video

Wanna Help Ubuntu?

Have you ever has that desire to help Ubuntu, but didn’t know how to do it? I know that I’ve always searched for ways to help out, but I’m and not a programmer by any means. I typically help out in the best ways I can..

Well, now there’s another way to help out. While this is not a new way of helping, it’s new to me. What is it?

Have you ever wondered where those screen shots come from in the Ubuntu Software Center (USC)? Who uploads them? Why are some so outdated? Well, they come from screenshots.debian.net. And guess what.. You can upload screenshots to them! All you have to do is follow their simple guidelines and submit a screenshot. If your screenshot is accepted, it will be available for all to see in the Ubuntu world!

What are the guidelines?

  • Screenshots are published under the terms of the packaged software itself.
  • Your screenshots must be in PNG format.
  • Due to legal reasons screenshots for non-free packages aren’t accepted.
  • Images larger than 800×600 pixels will automatically be reduced to that size (retaining the aspect ratio of course). So if you like to control the exact result of what you upload then make sure your image size is no larger than that.
  • Your screenshot should contain a typical scene when working with it. When snapshotting a browser load the debian.org home page. A screenshot of a graphics program should have a drawing loaded. Of a game please make a screenshot while you are playing and not of the start screen.
  • Nice tools for taking screenshots are shutter, ksnapshot (KDE), gimp, xwd or scrot. See the Debian wiki for more information on how to make screenshots under Debian.
  • You need not artificially switch off your window decorations.
  • Please set your language to english so that everybody understands it. If you don’t use english by default please start your application from a shell using after setting “export LANG=C”.
  • Please only take a screenshot of the respective application and not of your whole desktop (unless the screenshot is meant for a window manager).
  • Interlaced PNG files cannot be processed currently. Please use non-interlaced images.

Remember: your uploaded screenshot will not be visible immediately. It will first be checked by the admin team. It is already visible to you though.

It’s simple, easy, and allows you to help the FOSS world. Happy uploading!

Copy/Paste Like An Elephant

Being the avid Ubuntu users you all are, I’m sure you have also noticed one of those glaring bugs (yes, I consider this a bug) that has yet to be completely closed. It has to do with copy/paste. Yes, I know that copy/pasting things works…for the most part. There is that one lingering issue still, and feel free to try it out. Insert short-term memory loss…

Open a text file, copy something, close that window before pasting, open gedit, paste… Did anything happen? Probably not. The reason for this is because when the originating window is closed the clipboard forgets what was copied, thus not allowing a paste. There are programs that can fix this, but I think I may have discovered my favorite. Pastie.

Pastie is a clipboard manager with the memory of an elephant. It resides in your Indicator Applet and allows the ability to remember items that were copied historically. This is nice because you can re-paste items that were copied hours or even days ago. This is great if you’re like me and frequently forget terminal commands. 😉

Other new features Pastie 0.5.2 (stable) since the last stable version:

  • it’s very easy to use a custom icon for Pastie: simply place the icon you want Pastie to use in the ~/.pastie/ folder (folder does not already exist). The icon must be renamed to “pastie.svg” (“svg” can be any other kind of usable type of image). You can find an Elementary icon here, and mono icons here.
  • you can launch the Pastie preferences dialog using a keyboard shortcut: Ctrl + Alt + P.

It’s a great little program. Here’s how to get it:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:hel-sheep/pastie && sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
sudo apt-get install pastie

If you want to remove the PPA and downgrade, re-enable the PPA in System > Administration > Software Sources
sudo apt-get update
wget https://launchpad.net/~xorg-edgers/+archive/ppa... && sudo dpkg -i ppa-purge*.deb
sudo ppa-purge ppa:hel-sheep/pastie

And everything will be back as it was.

How To | Fix the Big and Ugly Plymouth Logo

UPDATE: Please see the newest rendition of this fix. Much simpler and faster. 🙂

http://wp.me/pR93c-8D

 


 

 

Note: The instructions provided here are created for beginners in Linux. There is no need to use the terminal. The first fix was developed by Hoa Nguyen from the Ubuntu community & Softpedia. All credits go to them! All I am doing is passing on the information that works for me. Enjoy!

Step 1: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

sudo apt-get install v86d

…a terminal window will appear. Enter your password when asked, hit the Enter key and wait for the package to be installed. The terminal window will automatically close!

Step 2: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

gksu gedit /etc/default/grub

…enter your password when asked and hit the Enter key.

– Replace the following line (line number 9):

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"

with this one:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nomodeset video=uvesafb:mode_option=1280x1024-24,mtrr=3,scroll=ywrap"

– Replace the following line (line number 18):

#GRUB_GFXMODE=640x480

with this one:

GRUB_GFXMODE=1280x1024

The file should look like this:

Save the file and close it!

Step 3: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

gksu gedit /etc/initramfs-tools/modules

When the text window appears, add the following line at the end of the file:

uvesafb mode_option=1280x1024-24 mtrr=3 scroll=ywrap

It should look like this:

Save the file and close it!

Step 4: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

echo FRAMEBUFFER=y | sudo tee /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/splash

…a terminal window will appear for a second or two. The terminal window will automatically close!

Step 5: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

sudo update-grub2

…a terminal window will appear. Enter your password when asked, hit the Enter key and wait for the command to finish. The terminal window will automatically close!

Step 6: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

sudo update-initramfs -u

…a terminal window will appear. Enter your password when asked, hit the Enter key and wait for the command to finish. The terminal window will automatically close!

Step 7: Reboot your computer. When the system starts, you should see a better looking Ubuntu logo!

Note: You can play a little with the resolution of the first fix, as 1280×1024 may not work for everyone! Just make sure that you change it in all three locations as indicated above.

Note 2: Check out this thread at the Ubuntu Forum for a possible faster solution.

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1498221