Posts Tagged ‘indicator’

How To | Change Your MeMenu Name

It’s a known and reported bug and while an easy front-end setting to choose the display name is still lacking, this can still be changed.

Responding to the bug report with a fix was a user called Ar. You can use either the Terminal to get the changes (easiest) or manually via the Gconf-Editor (ALT+F2 > gconf-editor)

To remove the name from the MeMenu altogether:

gconftool -s /system/indicator/me/display --type int 0

To show your real name/’about me’ name:

gconftool -s /system/indicator/me/display --type int 2

To display the default account username:

gconftool -s /system/indicator/me/display --type int 1

Note: The gconf-editor option will not be available until you attempt to change this option using the terminal first.

Remote Notifier for Android

If you’re anything like me, you have a tendency to leave your phone on silent while working, or maybe you leave your phone on vibrate while you’re working on the computer in the other room. In these situations, you might receive a message. Maybe it’s an SMS, an Email, a phone call or even knowing that the battery is running low.

Well, no longer will you have to worry about missing those all too critical messages. With Remote Notifier for Android, you always be notified of those incoming messages as long as you’re near your computer. It will use your computer’s built in notification system (NotifyOSD in Ubuntu) to display a toaster pop telling you that your phone has just received a message or call. You can install this on one or more of your computer’s as well so that no matter which computer you’re using you will receive the message. The great thing about this program is that it’s platform agnostic. Meaning it will run on Linux, Mac, & Windows.

It works utilizing two different methods of communication: Bluetooth sync to the computer or Wi-Fi. In my case, I used Wi-Fi since my home computer’s do not have Bluetooth.

How to get Remote Notifier for Android running:

  • Download and install the Remote Notifier for Android from the Android Market.
  • Go here to get the desktop half of the notification system.
    • To make things slightly easier for my Ubuntu friends: 32bit | 64bit
  • Install from the appropriate installer for your computer.
  • Run the desktop version.
  • Open the Android App and configure it according to your needs.

At this point, as long as both halves of the Notifier are running you should then begin receiving notifications immediately.

Android Market Link

Caps/Num/Scroll Lock Notifications

I’ve been waiting over a month to write this post. The reason that it’s taken me so long is because of a bug that the Ubuntu Devs. have refused to accept an a bug. It’s not their fault I guess, I’m sure they have their reasons. Well, that time has finally come for this post to happen!

One of the things that I’ve really liked about Ubuntu is the way that notifications are handled. They use a very stylish pop-up in the upper right corner of the screen. Well, for a long time, people have been calling it “broken” because of a feature that seems to have been simply, taken away. The ability to set a timeout for when it will force the pop-up to disappear. It seems kind of silly to me to remove this feature since it really hinders what a developer can do with the integrated notification system in Ubuntu. You know what, I’ll get back this in a moment…

What I wanted to be able to do is have a notification pop any time I pressed one of the following keys:

  • Caps Lock
  • Num Lock
  • Scroll Lock

Well, someone on the Ubuntu Forum (red_five) came up with a pretty handy little bash script that can do this pretty darn nicely. Well, actually, his was for Caps/Num Lock, I was forced to tweak the script and add Scroll Lock as well as fine tune the text to my liking. There was a draw back to this though. The notifications were taking a crazy long time (10 seconds) for them to finally disappear. So lets say that you quickly press the Caps Lock on and then back off, the notification stays up for about 20 seconds. Now, I know that 20 seconds is not a long time, but it sure seems that way when you’re looking at the notification….try it.

Well this is where I can get back to where I left off earlier. WebUpd8 recently had an article that spoke of someone who re-wrote the Notify-Osd source code re-adding back the functionality that was left out…TIMEOUTS!! So without further ado, here are the steps for setting up Notifications for Caps/Num/Scroll Lock.

Step 1: Replace Notify-Osd (Note that this patch is only available for 9.10 and up)

  • Add the new repository:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:leolik/leolik

  • Update & Upgrade:

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

  • Restart Notify-Osd:

pkill notify-osd

Step 2: Setting Up The Bash Script

  • Open gedit
  • Copy & Paste this in to a new file:
#!/bin/bash
icon="/usr/share/icons/gnome/scalable/devices/keyboard.svg"
case $1 in
 'scrl')
 mask=3
 key="Scroll"
 ;;
 'num')
 mask=2
 key="Num"
 ;;
 'caps')
 mask=1
 key="Caps"
 ;;
esac
value=$(xset q | grep "LED mask" | sed -r "s/.*LED mask:\s+[0-9a-fA-F]+([0-9a-fA-F]).*/\1/")
if [ $(( 0x$value & 0x$mask )) == $mask ]
then
 output="$key Lock"
 output2="On"
else
 output="$key Lock"
 output2="Off"
fi
notify-send -i $icon "$output" "$output2" -t 1000
  • Save the file as lock_keys to your desktop
  • Make the new file executable:

  • Move it to your /bin folder:

sudo mv ~/Desktop/lock_keys /bin

Step 3: Setting up the key bindings

  • Open CompizConfig Settings Manager
  • Click on Commands
  • Find three blank lines and enter these in them:
    • lock_keys caps
    • lock_keys num
    • lock_keys scrl
  • Click on the Key Bindings tab
  • Link the corresponding Run Command # with the command from the previous tab
    • Click on Disabled
    • Check Enabled
    • Click Grab Key Combination
    • Press the key
  • Close Settings Manager
  • Test

Thunderbird | Indicator Applet

UPDATE: Since writing this post there has been a much better version of this that has come to fruition. It’s also much much easier to set up and integrates FULLY with the indicator applet. WHat do you have to do? Download and install the following Thunderbird Add-on. Enjoy! 😀

Indicators for Thunderbird

I know that not everyone likes the new Indicator Applet, but I do. I like that it can centralize where notifications for certain programs can happen. However, the programs that actually utilize the indicator applet are not all programs that I use.

Like some others, I’ve removed Empathy & Evolution from my computer. To be completely honest, I never gave Empathy or Evolution a shot. The thing was, I already have programs that I like to use, and I want to continue to use them. For Instant Messaging, I use Pidgin and for email I use Thunderbird.

While Pidgin puts itself on the indicator applet as part of the installation, Thunderbird does not. I have searched for quite a while on how it can be added to that damn envelope.. and it’s finally happened.. Here’s how..

It’s quite a simple process, it just needed to be found. Open a terminal and type:

sudo gedit /usr/share/indicators/messages/applications/thunderbird

When the file opens, type in this line:

/usr/share/applications/xxxxxxxxxx.desktop

Please note that xxxxxxxxxx should be changed to the command used to summon Thunderbird. For me it was thunderbird-3.0

After this you should be able to see Thunderbird when you click on the indicator applet (Envelope). If you want the notifications that libnotify would give you, please check out the Mozilla Notification Extension