Posts Tagged ‘GIMP’

Fix ‘blank’ photo prints problem in GIMP

Many users were surprised to find out that, after upgrading to Maverick, GIMP no longer prints out photographs, but instead prints out blank pages. Fortunately, OMG! Ubuntu has found the fix to this, which should land in Maverick through the update-manager in a few weeks.

 

 

Instructions to get the fix (for the impatient)

Since ‘waiting for a few weeks for an annoying bug to be fixed’ is difficult for you and me, OMG! Ubuntu has created a PPA and uploaded the fixed version of GIMP to the PPA.

To install the fixed version of gimp, run the following commands in a terminal one after the other:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bilalakhtar/gimp

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

The PPA contains only the ‘gimp’ package, and it has been tested well, hence there are no chances of ‘horrible things happening’.

 

Thanks to OMG! Ubuntu

How To | Setup Gimpbox

In the past I’ve talked about my love for Gimp. I was one of those that felt a bit sad to hear that it would no longer be added by default in Ubuntu. Well, now there is more reason to love it!

There has been talks for a while now that the next major release of Gimp would allow users that ability to a single window version instead of the traditional 3-windowed version that is available now. Well, now people no longer have to wait for the official release to get their hands on this functionality! Enter…Gimpbox.

Gimpbox is simply a script that resides in your /bin folder and executes a single-window effect with your current Gimp. The installation of this script is extremely simple and can be executed by even the more novice of users. Here’s how to set up your Gimpbox:

Step 1: Open a terminal. Applications > Accessories > Terminal

Step 2: Copy/Paste this bit of code in to the terminal and press enter. This will download the script to the correct folder.

sudo wget http://gimpbox.googlecode.com/hg/gimpbox.py -O /usr/local/bin/gimpbox

Step 3: Copy/Paste this next bit of code in to the terminal and press enter. This will set the permissions on the script to execute properly.

sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/gimpbox

Step 4: Now that the script is in the correct location, we need to ensure that Gimp correctly recognizes the script. To do this we have to edit the Gimp entry in your Applications Menu. This is quite simple really.

  • Right-click on ‘Applications’
  • Click on ‘Graphics’ in the left hand pane
  • Highlight ‘GIMP Image Editor’ and click on the ‘Properties’ button
  • Replace the word ‘gimp’ with ‘gimpbox’

Now you’re all done! Just go to Applications > Graphics > Gimp Image Editor and open the program. You will see Gimp load and then after a second or two, all three of the traditional Gimp windows will be converter to a single-window style. 🙂

NOTE: If you’re having trouble running this please ensure you have python-wnck installed.

sudo apt-get install python-wnck


BONUS: If you’re like me and you launch your Gimp from Docky, you will notice that simply editing the launch command in the Applications menu does not launch Gimpbox from Docky. Here is the work around for this:

Step 1: Open Nautilus with root privileges and go to /usr/share/applications and locate Gimp.

gksu nautilus /usr/share/applications

Step 2: Right-click on Gimp and change the launch command to gimpbox %u

Your Gimpbox will now launch correctly from Docky. 😀

sudo wget http://gimpbox.googlecode.com/hg/gimpbox.py -O /usr/local/bin/gimpbox

GIMP

During my time in the Windows operating system, there were many times in which I needed an art program to do one of many different things. One of the biggest things that I do is create Power Point presentations at work. In these presentations I use a lot of visual examples of what I’m trying to tell my audience (You would be surprised how many people don’t read the words of an instruction manual and instead just follow the pictures).

Back then I was trying to use Windows Paint. If you don’t remember Windows Paint, It was that little program that could barely handle the simple task of Cropping a photo. Needless to say, it was not worth using any longer. Then I made the switch to Ubuntu and discovered GIMP.

Here’s a little description of the program shown on GIMP’s website…

GIMP is an acronym for GNU Image Manipulation Program. It is a freely distributed program for such tasks as photo retouching, image composition and image authoring.

It has many capabilities. It can be used as a simple paint program, an expert quality photo retouching program, an online batch processing system, a mass production image renderer, an image format converter, etc.

GIMP is expandable and extensible. It is designed to be augmented with plug-ins and extensions to do just about anything. The advanced scripting interface allows everything from the simplest task to the most complex image manipulation procedures to be easily scripted.

I have to say, GIMP is quite the amazing program. It has saved me so much time, but more importantly headache, when I create my instruction manuals. But other than that, GIMP has allowed me the ability to touch up pictures so that they look flawless, I’ve also used it to create favicons for websites.

The only thing about the programs that really bothered me was that I was not able to use it while I was at work using Windows XP. I was still stuck making everything on my personal computer at home or using RealVNC to access my computer at home and then email the finished product back to my work station. This is when I discovered something wonderful…..

GIMP is written and developed under X11 on UNIX platforms. But basically the same code also runs on MS Windows and Mac OS X.

That’s right folks. GIMP is not only available for Linux, but also for Mac OS X and Windows. My life has become so much better/easier after discovering GIMP. Give it a shot….trust me.

GIMP

Please note that this is NOT me creating this video. Created by GIMP Know How.