Posts Tagged ‘editing’

Create a Background Slideshow [CreBS]

If you’re anything like me, you’ve been looking for a nice and easy way to create your own Slideshow Wallpaper. I still don’t quite understand why this feature would have been added to Ubuntu without a simple tool that can be used to create one yourself, whatever. When this was first released, I thought to myself, “I’m sure the Ubuntu devs will release a program to create these things in the next version of Ubuntu”…I was wrong.

Yes I know that I can break down the XML file and create my own Slideshow, but that can get to be quite tedious, especially it you have more than five wallpapers in the show. Well, after some time, and even forgetting about the idea of creating one by myself, I stumbled upon an app that can achieve exactly what I’ve been looking for.

Introducing CreBS! Also known as “Create a Background Slideshow.”

CreBS will allow you to add as many wallpapers/pictures as you like, adjust the delay between changes and the length of transition. It’s a great app. But lets get down to the part you really wanna see, how to download/install the app and then how to use the thing.

Here are the three commands needed to download/install:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:crebs/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install crebs

Step 1: Now that you have the app installed, it’s time to get started. Once you have the app open, click on the “plus” icon to select the pictures you would like to use for your slideshow.

 

Step 2: Choose the “Display for” and “Transition” times. You can use the defaults or you can select your own times.

 

Step 3: Click the check mark to save and set the wallpaper.

 

Now you can enjoy your new Wallpaper Slideshow…excuse me…Background Slideshow. 🙂 By the way, you may or may not have noticed that my screenshots have what looks like different backgrounds in them, that’s because I typed up this post and took the  screenshots while my wallpaper was changing. 🙂

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Fix ‘blank’ photo prints problem in GIMP

Many users were surprised to find out that, after upgrading to Maverick, GIMP no longer prints out photographs, but instead prints out blank pages. Fortunately, OMG! Ubuntu has found the fix to this, which should land in Maverick through the update-manager in a few weeks.

 

 

Instructions to get the fix (for the impatient)

Since ‘waiting for a few weeks for an annoying bug to be fixed’ is difficult for you and me, OMG! Ubuntu has created a PPA and uploaded the fixed version of GIMP to the PPA.

To install the fixed version of gimp, run the following commands in a terminal one after the other:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bilalakhtar/gimp

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

The PPA contains only the ‘gimp’ package, and it has been tested well, hence there are no chances of ‘horrible things happening’.

 

Thanks to OMG! Ubuntu

How To | Customize Your Docky

I’ve made it known in the past that I’m a Docky user. I love my Docky, and everything about it. Here are some ways that Docky users can customize their settings to spice things up a bit. Thank you to OMG! Ubuntu for making me aware of these tips.

1. Blur the dock background

  1. Open up Compiz-Config-Settings-Manager from the System > Preferences menu
  2. Enable ‘Blur’ by checking the box next to the icon
  3. Now click on the blur icon to enter the blur config area
  4. Here you want to add Docky to the list of ‘Alpha blur windows’. Use either the ‘grab’ method (by clicking the green cross) or by manually adding ‘class=Docky’ to the entry field.

File:Docky.png

2. Add more themes

Download one of the themes below, click the Anchor icon followed by the ‘Install theme’ button and locate the .tar file. The new themes will be available for use.

3. Change the urgent color glow

The color of the alert ‘glow’ used to notify you that a dock item wants your attention is also configurable. To change it:

  1. Press Alt + F2
  2. Type “gconf-editor” (without the quotes)
  3. Navigate to: apps > docky-2 > Docky > DockController
  4. Experiment with finding a color that suits you by changing the UrgentHue value to a number between -180 to 180. The default is 150.

4. Launch any application using the Anchor icon

You can set the Docky Anchor icon to launch any application you like. Here’s how: –

  1. Press ALT + F2 together
  2. Type “gconf-editor” (without the quotes)
  3. Navigate to: apps > docky-2 > Docky > Items > DockyItem
  4. Enter a command in the DockyItemCommand field to launch a specific application/action.

For example to launch the Gnome Control Centre when clicking on the Anchor enter:

gnomecontrolcenter”

5. Learn how to make themes

You know you want to…I know I want to! There can never be too many themes for Docky. To learn how to make a theme visit wiki.go-docky.com/index.php?title=Theme_Specification. When you have a completed theme, add them to gnome-look.org. 🙂

Finally…

If by the end of all that you’re not ready to end your Docky High…you can download this cool Docky inspired wallpaper made by ~ebupof.

docky_1280_4

For more Docky tips, information and answers to common questions you can head over to the Docky Wiki: wiki.go-docky.com

Copy/Paste Like An Elephant

Being the avid Ubuntu users you all are, I’m sure you have also noticed one of those glaring bugs (yes, I consider this a bug) that has yet to be completely closed. It has to do with copy/paste. Yes, I know that copy/pasting things works…for the most part. There is that one lingering issue still, and feel free to try it out. Insert short-term memory loss…

Open a text file, copy something, close that window before pasting, open gedit, paste… Did anything happen? Probably not. The reason for this is because when the originating window is closed the clipboard forgets what was copied, thus not allowing a paste. There are programs that can fix this, but I think I may have discovered my favorite. Pastie.

Pastie is a clipboard manager with the memory of an elephant. It resides in your Indicator Applet and allows the ability to remember items that were copied historically. This is nice because you can re-paste items that were copied hours or even days ago. This is great if you’re like me and frequently forget terminal commands. 😉

Other new features Pastie 0.5.2 (stable) since the last stable version:

  • it’s very easy to use a custom icon for Pastie: simply place the icon you want Pastie to use in the ~/.pastie/ folder (folder does not already exist). The icon must be renamed to “pastie.svg” (“svg” can be any other kind of usable type of image). You can find an Elementary icon here, and mono icons here.
  • you can launch the Pastie preferences dialog using a keyboard shortcut: Ctrl + Alt + P.

It’s a great little program. Here’s how to get it:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:hel-sheep/pastie && sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
sudo apt-get install pastie

If you want to remove the PPA and downgrade, re-enable the PPA in System > Administration > Software Sources
sudo apt-get update
wget https://launchpad.net/~xorg-edgers/+archive/ppa... && sudo dpkg -i ppa-purge*.deb
sudo ppa-purge ppa:hel-sheep/pastie

And everything will be back as it was.

Caps/Num/Scroll Lock Notifications

I’ve been waiting over a month to write this post. The reason that it’s taken me so long is because of a bug that the Ubuntu Devs. have refused to accept an a bug. It’s not their fault I guess, I’m sure they have their reasons. Well, that time has finally come for this post to happen!

One of the things that I’ve really liked about Ubuntu is the way that notifications are handled. They use a very stylish pop-up in the upper right corner of the screen. Well, for a long time, people have been calling it “broken” because of a feature that seems to have been simply, taken away. The ability to set a timeout for when it will force the pop-up to disappear. It seems kind of silly to me to remove this feature since it really hinders what a developer can do with the integrated notification system in Ubuntu. You know what, I’ll get back this in a moment…

What I wanted to be able to do is have a notification pop any time I pressed one of the following keys:

  • Caps Lock
  • Num Lock
  • Scroll Lock

Well, someone on the Ubuntu Forum (red_five) came up with a pretty handy little bash script that can do this pretty darn nicely. Well, actually, his was for Caps/Num Lock, I was forced to tweak the script and add Scroll Lock as well as fine tune the text to my liking. There was a draw back to this though. The notifications were taking a crazy long time (10 seconds) for them to finally disappear. So lets say that you quickly press the Caps Lock on and then back off, the notification stays up for about 20 seconds. Now, I know that 20 seconds is not a long time, but it sure seems that way when you’re looking at the notification….try it.

Well this is where I can get back to where I left off earlier. WebUpd8 recently had an article that spoke of someone who re-wrote the Notify-Osd source code re-adding back the functionality that was left out…TIMEOUTS!! So without further ado, here are the steps for setting up Notifications for Caps/Num/Scroll Lock.

Step 1: Replace Notify-Osd (Note that this patch is only available for 9.10 and up)

  • Add the new repository:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:leolik/leolik

  • Update & Upgrade:

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

  • Restart Notify-Osd:

pkill notify-osd

Step 2: Setting Up The Bash Script

  • Open gedit
  • Copy & Paste this in to a new file:
#!/bin/bash
icon="/usr/share/icons/gnome/scalable/devices/keyboard.svg"
case $1 in
 'scrl')
 mask=3
 key="Scroll"
 ;;
 'num')
 mask=2
 key="Num"
 ;;
 'caps')
 mask=1
 key="Caps"
 ;;
esac
value=$(xset q | grep "LED mask" | sed -r "s/.*LED mask:\s+[0-9a-fA-F]+([0-9a-fA-F]).*/\1/")
if [ $(( 0x$value & 0x$mask )) == $mask ]
then
 output="$key Lock"
 output2="On"
else
 output="$key Lock"
 output2="Off"
fi
notify-send -i $icon "$output" "$output2" -t 1000
  • Save the file as lock_keys to your desktop
  • Make the new file executable:

  • Move it to your /bin folder:

sudo mv ~/Desktop/lock_keys /bin

Step 3: Setting up the key bindings

  • Open CompizConfig Settings Manager
  • Click on Commands
  • Find three blank lines and enter these in them:
    • lock_keys caps
    • lock_keys num
    • lock_keys scrl
  • Click on the Key Bindings tab
  • Link the corresponding Run Command # with the command from the previous tab
    • Click on Disabled
    • Check Enabled
    • Click Grab Key Combination
    • Press the key
  • Close Settings Manager
  • Test

OpenShot Video Editor

When I made my transition to Ubuntu there were quite a few hurdles that I needed to jump. One of these hurdles was finding a good video editor. There were some other programs that I tried first, but they just didn’t cut it for me. They either didn’t have the features that I was looking for, or they were just too clunky and not very user friendly. Then I stumbled on to a thread in the Ubuntu Forums that talked about good video editors that are available. One of the posters mentioned OpenShot. Since this was the only one that I had not heard of yet, I decided to give it a whirl.

People always say that your first impression of something is always the most important one. Well my first impression of this program was purely based on it’s visual layout. Needless to say, the program looked really nice. It has a great layout and looking at it’s features you can see that it’s quite robust.

Here is a little snippet from Linux and Free software

OpenShot is a video editor for Linux. The project was started by Jonathan Thomas in 2008. The goal of OpenShot is to be a free, stable and user friendly video editor. It is licensed under GNU general public license. OpenShot supports many video and audio file formats. You can resize, trim and cut clips. There are also video transitions with real time previews and many other features.

Over time the program has grown by leaps and bounds. The creator has added the ability to combine your video with special effects and they have also recently added their own PPA giving users the chance to install and have the program updated more easily.

One of the things that I find to be very important to me is having the choice of stripping the audio out of an imported video and then add my own audio track in the background. With OpenShot, I have the ability to do this plus much more. Long story short, I suggest giving this program a try. You wont be let down.