Posts Tagged ‘community’

We > 1%

A new ‘Linux counter’ initiative that aims to disprove press claims than Linux is used by less than 1% of the world’s desktop computer users has been launched.

Current estimates of worldwide Linux usage by StatCounter pin it a 0.77% share over the last 12 months, and a slightly lower figure of 0.75% since they began taking records.

Oddly, Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer has often contested this view stating that he suspects Linux market share is in fact greater than that of Mac OS X.

Whatever the truth you can willingly add your voice to the noble-project  over at http://www.dudalibre.com/gnulinuxcounter?lang=en

A new ‘Linux counter’ initiative that aims to disprove press claims than Linux is used by less than 1% of the worlds desktop computer users has been launched.

Current estimates of worldwide Linux usage by StatCounter pin it a 0.77% share over the last 12 months, and a slightly lower figure of 0.75% since they began taking records.

Oddly, Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer has often contested this view stating that he suspects Linux market share is in fact greater than that of Mac OS X.

Whatever the truth you can willingly add your voice to the noble-project  over @ dudalibre.com/gnulinuxcounter

Wanna Help Ubuntu?

Have you ever has that desire to help Ubuntu, but didn’t know how to do it? I know that I’ve always searched for ways to help out, but I’m and not a programmer by any means. I typically help out in the best ways I can..

Well, now there’s another way to help out. While this is not a new way of helping, it’s new to me. What is it?

Have you ever wondered where those screen shots come from in the Ubuntu Software Center (USC)? Who uploads them? Why are some so outdated? Well, they come from screenshots.debian.net. And guess what.. You can upload screenshots to them! All you have to do is follow their simple guidelines and submit a screenshot. If your screenshot is accepted, it will be available for all to see in the Ubuntu world!

What are the guidelines?

  • Screenshots are published under the terms of the packaged software itself.
  • Your screenshots must be in PNG format.
  • Due to legal reasons screenshots for non-free packages aren’t accepted.
  • Images larger than 800×600 pixels will automatically be reduced to that size (retaining the aspect ratio of course). So if you like to control the exact result of what you upload then make sure your image size is no larger than that.
  • Your screenshot should contain a typical scene when working with it. When snapshotting a browser load the debian.org home page. A screenshot of a graphics program should have a drawing loaded. Of a game please make a screenshot while you are playing and not of the start screen.
  • Nice tools for taking screenshots are shutter, ksnapshot (KDE), gimp, xwd or scrot. See the Debian wiki for more information on how to make screenshots under Debian.
  • You need not artificially switch off your window decorations.
  • Please set your language to english so that everybody understands it. If you don’t use english by default please start your application from a shell using after setting “export LANG=C”.
  • Please only take a screenshot of the respective application and not of your whole desktop (unless the screenshot is meant for a window manager).
  • Interlaced PNG files cannot be processed currently. Please use non-interlaced images.

Remember: your uploaded screenshot will not be visible immediately. It will first be checked by the admin team. It is already visible to you though.

It’s simple, easy, and allows you to help the FOSS world. Happy uploading!

Who Ya Gonna Call!…

As with any new users to Ubuntu, I have been hit with my fair share of frustrations. I don’t whine and complain about how my computer won’t do this or won’t do that. Instead, I go out and find the solution. (Just ask my wife, she knows I’m too stubborn to give up until I find the solution to a problem)

On this journey of mine there has really been a place that I know I can go to and receive support from wonderful ‘experts.’ I use quotations for a reason, but I’ll get to that soon. This place that I seek answers to my Ubuntu mysteries is the Ubuntu Forums. This has been a place that I can always go to for support. I mean support in different ways: problems that I’m having, questions about a new program that I discovered, or even guidance from a friend about something going on in life.

One of my favorite places to be while at the forum is the Community Cafe; this is typically where I spend most of my time. The conversations are so eclectic that I love it there. I can read things ranging from Ubuntu barking at cats to finding Malicious applications found on Android marketplace. It’s really a fun place to be at.

When I can, I try to head over to the Absolute Beginner Forum. Even though I am no Ubuntu or Linux ‘expert’ (see, there it is again 😉 ) I might still be able to help someone that has been using Ubuntu for a shorter period of time than I, and that person might consider me to be an expert if I was able to solve their problem. I know that I have thought this. Someone helps me to fix a problem that has been driving me up the wall, and I might think of them as an expert at what they’re doing. This is what I love about Ubuntu and Linux, anyone can help anyone. There is always going to be someone that is asking for assistance with something that I may have encountered in the past.

In the past I’ve used different forums for various reasons, but none of them have ever compared with this one. The Ubuntu Forum is truly a community. People like each other and help each other as if we were all brother and sisters. We care about the well being of the other user and will offer as much assistance as we possibly can. People working together is a wonderful thing.

I don’t want to forget to mention the Moderators either. I have always felt that the Mods at the Ubuntu Forum are quite level headed and fair as far as how they treat the users. I have never once suspected one of them of playing favorites with a user for any reason. But truly the best part is that the whole community of users can be considered a Moderator in itself. Using the Report Abuse button can really come in handy when someone has crossed the line. Do I feel like bad when I report someone?…no. There are times when people forget that the person on the other side of the post is a real person. They might say something that could go against the Code of Conduct, and those things should be reported. But as I mentioned before, the forums are still a great place to be.

A little history:

UbuntuForums History:The UbuntuForums were created by Ryan Troy (ubuntu-geek) in October 2004 the forums quickly became a popular resource for Ubuntu and was deemed the Official Ubuntu forums in November 2004. The forums hosting continued to be maintained and paid for by Ryan until March 2006 when Canonical graciously offered hosting for the forums. In June of 2007 the forums domain, license and assests were transfered over to Canonical they now maintain sole ownership of the forums. Ryan continues maintain the forums and serve’s on the Forums Council along with KiwiNZ, jdong, Technoviking, matthew, bodhi.zazen and bapoumba.