Plymouth Manager | Change Your Boot Theme

If you’re fortunate enough to have a graphics card capable of displaying Plymouth boot splashes then ‘Plymouth Manager’ may just be of interest.

Features include:

  • Enable/disable Plymouth
  • Set splash resolution
  • Fixing errant errors
  • Choosing/creating new themes

Find most recent download at launchpad.net/plymouth-manager/+download

If you’re up for the task, why not help translate it to your language? http://plymouthmanager.wordpress.com/about/

Fix ‘blank’ photo prints problem in GIMP

Many users were surprised to find out that, after upgrading to Maverick, GIMP no longer prints out photographs, but instead prints out blank pages. Fortunately, OMG! Ubuntu has found the fix to this, which should land in Maverick through the update-manager in a few weeks.

 

 

Instructions to get the fix (for the impatient)

Since ‘waiting for a few weeks for an annoying bug to be fixed’ is difficult for you and me, OMG! Ubuntu has created a PPA and uploaded the fixed version of GIMP to the PPA.

To install the fixed version of gimp, run the following commands in a terminal one after the other:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bilalakhtar/gimp

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

The PPA contains only the ‘gimp’ package, and it has been tested well, hence there are no chances of ‘horrible things happening’.

 

Thanks to OMG! Ubuntu

How To | Change Your MeMenu Name

It’s a known and reported bug and while an easy front-end setting to choose the display name is still lacking, this can still be changed.

Responding to the bug report with a fix was a user called Ar. You can use either the Terminal to get the changes (easiest) or manually via the Gconf-Editor (ALT+F2 > gconf-editor)

To remove the name from the MeMenu altogether:

gconftool -s /system/indicator/me/display --type int 0

To show your real name/’about me’ name:

gconftool -s /system/indicator/me/display --type int 2

To display the default account username:

gconftool -s /system/indicator/me/display --type int 1

Note: The gconf-editor option will not be available until you attempt to change this option using the terminal first.

How To | Use Docky Anchor to Change Docky Icons

In the past I talked about how a Docky user can change their Docky icons by navigating to the appropriate folder in Nautilus. Well, now I can take that one step further.

I’m going to show you how to use your Docky Anchor icon to navigate directly to that lovely Nautilus folder all with one click. For those of you that are worried that doing this might not allow you to open your Docky Settings, don;t worry. You will still be able to right-click on the Anchor and click Settings.

Step 1: GConf-Editor

  • Open your gconf-editor by navigating to Applications > System Tools > Configuration Editor (or gconf-editor in your terminal)
  • Navigate to /apps/docky-2/Docky/Items/DockyItem/
  • Change DockyItemCommand to gksu nautilus /usr/share/applications
  • Close GConf-Editor

Step 2: Change your Icons

  • Click on your Docky Anchor
  • Type in your password
  • Navigate to the program icon you would like to change

Father of Social Networking worms (Koobface) comes to Linux and Mac OS X via Java

The Bad

On social networking sites like Twitter, Facebook and MySpace, if someone says to you ”Is it you in this video?,” be warned, because in reality, it leads to a fake YouTube page with a thumbnail which when clicked checks you OS version, downloads a Java applet called jnana.tsa on Linux and exploits a Remote Code Execution vulnerability in outdated versions of Java. Once installed on a computer, the worm hijacks the social networking accounts of its owner and uses them to propagate.

The Good

The applet is dropped inside the user’s home directory and stops running at computer reboot. This means that on Linux, unlike on Windows, the Koobface infections are temporary. Which means if you happen to get that infection,  reboot immediately.

The Ugly

This shows that Linux and Mac OS X users aren’t vulnerable to malware, as their market share increases they will become an attractive target for social networking worms like Koobface.

via Softpedia

How To | Droid VNC Server

If you’re anything me, you’ve Rooted your Android phone and you’re looking for all of the coolest apps available to you. For a long time I’ve been looking for a great app that would allow me to remotely access my HTC DROID Incredible using VNC. Why would I want to remotely access my phone you ask? I’m lazy. No, just kidding. 😉

Benefits of remote access:

  • Access to your phone if it’s not immediately with you.
  • Ability to create a screencast.
  • Faster screen shots.
  • Ability to help & support other Android users.
  • Access your phone if you’re at work or school and don’t want to look like you’re on your phone. 😉
  • etc…

Well, now I have discovered Droid VNC Server. Created by onaips at the XDA forums.

Droid VNC Server is a great little app. It’s not without it’s bugs, but the bugs that I have do not even come close to outweighing it’s positives. While I have not officially seen any confirmations of Droid VNC Server working on the Incredible, it does work quite nicely for me. In regards to other Android phones, your mileage may vary, but you can check out onaips blog to see a small listing of confirmed functional devices.

Ok, enough talking. How do I use this thing?

Step 1: Preparing your computer

You will have to be sure that you have a VNC Viewer installed on your computer first. Here’s a quick list of programs that can be used:

  • Linux – Remote Desktop Viewer (However, I use the command line). Remote Desktop Viewer is pre-installed in Ubuntu.
  • Mac – Chicken of the VNC.
  • Windows – RealVNC.

Step 2: Preparing your Android device

  • Scan the QR Code at the top of the page to be directed to the Droid VNC Server page in the Android Market.
  • Open Droid VNC Server and tap Start Server.
  • Suggestion – Connect to a wireless signal that your computer is also using or use USB. (I have not yet tested USB & Verizon does not support VNC through 3G)
  • Feel free to modify any of the options in Menu > Settings. (I’d recommend a password)

Step 3: Connect to your Device

  • Open your VNC Viewer of choice and type in the IP:Port that you see listed on the Droid VNC Server home screen.
  • Type in your password if needed.
  • You should now see your Android Device!

Some helpful things to know:

Some possible incorrect keybindings: (I have a feeling this is an Android thing…)

  • = sends +
  • ! sends ~
  • ~ sends 0
  • < sends *
  • > sends #
  • / sends :

These are important to know: 😉

  • home = home
  • right-click = home, also
  • pg up = menu
  • pg down = call
  • pg down long press = redial most recent
  • esc = back
  • del = back, also
  • end = phone sleep
  • type = from the home screen random typing will initiate google search

Here are some instructions for using VNC through USB:

I have heard that USB will provide a faster VNC connection. With adb installed and the device plugged in via USB:
adb forward tcp:5901 tcp:5901
adb forward tcp:5801 tcp:5801

Using your preferred VNC Viewer, connect to:

localhost:5901

YouTube How To (Not created by me)


How To | Install Docky Stacks

Install Stacks in Docky with one command

The script automatically fetches and installs the files needed to both install and successfully run Docky with Stacks.

Open a terminal and enter the following line carefully:

wget href="http://www.panticz.de/sites/default/files/Docky/compile.docky.stacks.sh.txt -O - | bash -

 

 


Click here to see the original article and the source code of the bash script.