Archive for December, 2010

Intelligent Plymouth Boot Splash

This is an idea straight out of those futuristic 80’s movies! However, it works and it’s not done on a Commodore 64. With this neat little customization, your splash screen will be happy to greet you any time you want to use your computer. Created by OMG!Ubuntu reader Shnatsel and assured to do nothing to hurt your computers, it’s ready to go! 😀

“It also should be safe to install and use – it won’t break anything, the worst thing it can do is fall back to text mode (but the system will still boot to GUI).”

First thing to be aware of us is if Plymouth looks like a mess to you now it will continue to look a mess with this; you’ll need to fix that.

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:shnatsel/plymouth

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install plymouth-theme-smooth-greeting

To uninstall run:

sudo apt-get remove plymouth-theme-smooth-greeting

loader02 

How To | Gnome Panel As A “Wingpanel”

Liking that new fangled Wingpanel we’re all hearing about? Want one of your own? Turn your Gnome Panel in to one!

The trick is to get a floating Gnome panel (the rest is pretty much obvious). Read on!

Step 1. Remove all the panel applets that you don’t want to use – like the menu.

Step 2. Right click the panel, select “Propreties” and on the “General” tab, uncheck the expand option and enable autohide. Now simply drag the panel to the right side of the screen.

Step 3. Now let’s simulate a “floating effect” for the Gnome panel (that means the panel will always be visible but it covers the applications as opposed to when the panel is always visible – when the windows cannot go underneath the panel):

Press ALT + F2 and enter “gconf-editor”, navigate to apps > panel > toplevels and click “panel_0” or “panel_1” (it depends on the panel you want to apply this for). Then, modify the “hide_delay” key value to “2147483647” which is the maximum supported value. This is the panel hide delay which is now set to “2147483647” so the panel will take around 600 hours to hide (so it’s not really going to hide), thus becoming a “floating panel”.

Tip thanks to Justin | via Justin Stories.