Archive for September, 2010

How To | Install LibreOffice

With all the talk of OpenOffice being forked by The Document Foundation into LibreOffice the past couple of days, The Document Foundation has released a beta version of LibreOffice that can be installed on Ubuntu.

Please note that LibreOffice is still a beta version and not meant for production purposes.

If you want to remove OpenOffice before installing LibreOffice, you can do so by running following command:

sudo apt-get remove openoffice*.*

Follow the instructions to install LibreOffice on Ubuntu:

  • Download appropriate version from here
  • Extract the file to ~/Desktop
  • Rename the file as libreoffice
  • Enter the following command into terminal and wait for the process to finish.
sudo dpkg -i ~/Desktop/libreoffice/DEBS/*.deb
  • Run the following command to finish the installation:
sudo dpkg -i ~/Desktop/libreoffice/DEBS/desktop-integration/libreoffice3.3-debian-menus_3.3-9526_all.deb

That’s it. You can now access LibreOffice from Applications > Office
Many Thanks to scouser73 from ubuntuforums and Ubuntu Vibes for the info!

If LibreOffice is not for you, you can remove it by running this command in the terminal:

sudo apt-get remove libreoffice-debian-menus libreoffice-ure

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Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat Release Candidate now available for download

It may not be the official release day yet, but Ubuntu 10.10 Release Candidate is now available for download. The release can be downloaded from releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/ or using the direct links below.

What’s new

New features, updates and changes from the Beta release last month:

Downloads

Be sure to verify the MD5SUMS before burning your LiveCD!! How to check your MD5SUMS…

List of MD5SUMS can be found here: http://releases.ubuntu.com/10.10/MD5SUMS

Ubuntu 10.10 Desktop

These are the links for the LiveCD .iso. Where possible try to use BitTorrent for downloading as not only will you get it faster so will everyone else!

Ubuntu 10.10 Alternate

The alternate install CD allows you to perform certain specialist installations of Ubuntu.

Ubuntu Netbook Edition

The netbook .iso can be installed to a USB for drive-less installation using the USB Startup tool that Ubuntu ships with.

Ubuntu 10.10 Server

 

 

Thanks to WebUpd8 for this video

How To | Setup Gimpbox

In the past I’ve talked about my love for Gimp. I was one of those that felt a bit sad to hear that it would no longer be added by default in Ubuntu. Well, now there is more reason to love it!

There has been talks for a while now that the next major release of Gimp would allow users that ability to a single window version instead of the traditional 3-windowed version that is available now. Well, now people no longer have to wait for the official release to get their hands on this functionality! Enter…Gimpbox.

Gimpbox is simply a script that resides in your /bin folder and executes a single-window effect with your current Gimp. The installation of this script is extremely simple and can be executed by even the more novice of users. Here’s how to set up your Gimpbox:

Step 1: Open a terminal. Applications > Accessories > Terminal

Step 2: Copy/Paste this bit of code in to the terminal and press enter. This will download the script to the correct folder.

sudo wget http://gimpbox.googlecode.com/hg/gimpbox.py -O /usr/local/bin/gimpbox

Step 3: Copy/Paste this next bit of code in to the terminal and press enter. This will set the permissions on the script to execute properly.

sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/gimpbox

Step 4: Now that the script is in the correct location, we need to ensure that Gimp correctly recognizes the script. To do this we have to edit the Gimp entry in your Applications Menu. This is quite simple really.

  • Right-click on ‘Applications’
  • Click on ‘Graphics’ in the left hand pane
  • Highlight ‘GIMP Image Editor’ and click on the ‘Properties’ button
  • Replace the word ‘gimp’ with ‘gimpbox’

Now you’re all done! Just go to Applications > Graphics > Gimp Image Editor and open the program. You will see Gimp load and then after a second or two, all three of the traditional Gimp windows will be converter to a single-window style. 🙂

NOTE: If you’re having trouble running this please ensure you have python-wnck installed.

sudo apt-get install python-wnck


BONUS: If you’re like me and you launch your Gimp from Docky, you will notice that simply editing the launch command in the Applications menu does not launch Gimpbox from Docky. Here is the work around for this:

Step 1: Open Nautilus with root privileges and go to /usr/share/applications and locate Gimp.

gksu nautilus /usr/share/applications

Step 2: Right-click on Gimp and change the launch command to gimpbox %u

Your Gimpbox will now launch correctly from Docky. 😀

sudo wget http://gimpbox.googlecode.com/hg/gimpbox.py -O /usr/local/bin/gimpbox

How To | Customize Your Docky

I’ve made it known in the past that I’m a Docky user. I love my Docky, and everything about it. Here are some ways that Docky users can customize their settings to spice things up a bit. Thank you to OMG! Ubuntu for making me aware of these tips.

1. Blur the dock background

  1. Open up Compiz-Config-Settings-Manager from the System > Preferences menu
  2. Enable ‘Blur’ by checking the box next to the icon
  3. Now click on the blur icon to enter the blur config area
  4. Here you want to add Docky to the list of ‘Alpha blur windows’. Use either the ‘grab’ method (by clicking the green cross) or by manually adding ‘class=Docky’ to the entry field.

File:Docky.png

2. Add more themes

Download one of the themes below, click the Anchor icon followed by the ‘Install theme’ button and locate the .tar file. The new themes will be available for use.

3. Change the urgent color glow

The color of the alert ‘glow’ used to notify you that a dock item wants your attention is also configurable. To change it:

  1. Press Alt + F2
  2. Type “gconf-editor” (without the quotes)
  3. Navigate to: apps > docky-2 > Docky > DockController
  4. Experiment with finding a color that suits you by changing the UrgentHue value to a number between -180 to 180. The default is 150.

4. Launch any application using the Anchor icon

You can set the Docky Anchor icon to launch any application you like. Here’s how: –

  1. Press ALT + F2 together
  2. Type “gconf-editor” (without the quotes)
  3. Navigate to: apps > docky-2 > Docky > Items > DockyItem
  4. Enter a command in the DockyItemCommand field to launch a specific application/action.

For example to launch the Gnome Control Centre when clicking on the Anchor enter:

gnomecontrolcenter”

5. Learn how to make themes

You know you want to…I know I want to! There can never be too many themes for Docky. To learn how to make a theme visit wiki.go-docky.com/index.php?title=Theme_Specification. When you have a completed theme, add them to gnome-look.org. 🙂

Finally…

If by the end of all that you’re not ready to end your Docky High…you can download this cool Docky inspired wallpaper made by ~ebupof.

docky_1280_4

For more Docky tips, information and answers to common questions you can head over to the Docky Wiki: wiki.go-docky.com

How To | Thunderbird/Android Calendar Sync

Have you been wondering the best way to sync your Android calendar with your Thunderbird calendar (via Lightning). Well, you’ve come to the right place!

I personally know that I’ve been looking for this tool. Here’s how I like to sync my Android calendar with my Thunderbird…

Step 1: Download Provider for Google Calendar

Step 2: Open Thunderbird and go to the add-ons menu. (Tools > Add-ons)

Step 3: Click Install and then locate the newly downloaded add-on, after Thunderbird has restarted, go to your calendar

Step 4: On the left side, where your calendars are listed, right-click and select “New Calendar,” click “Network Calendar” and then “Google Calendar.” Stop here and proceed to Firefox

Step 5: Open your calendar that is associated with your Android phone and in the upper right corner click Settings > Calendar Settings

Step 6: Click the “Calendars” tab and then click on the email address associated with your Android phone

Step 7: Near the bottom you will see “Private Address,” click on XML and copy the URL shown on the screen and go back to Thunderbird where you stopped on Step 6

Step 8: Paste the URL of your “Private Calendar” here and click Next

Your Android calendar should now appear in your Thunderbird calendar. They will sync in both directions making it nice and easy to add/remove/edit your events.

Remote Notifier for Android

If you’re anything like me, you have a tendency to leave your phone on silent while working, or maybe you leave your phone on vibrate while you’re working on the computer in the other room. In these situations, you might receive a message. Maybe it’s an SMS, an Email, a phone call or even knowing that the battery is running low.

Well, no longer will you have to worry about missing those all too critical messages. With Remote Notifier for Android, you always be notified of those incoming messages as long as you’re near your computer. It will use your computer’s built in notification system (NotifyOSD in Ubuntu) to display a toaster pop telling you that your phone has just received a message or call. You can install this on one or more of your computer’s as well so that no matter which computer you’re using you will receive the message. The great thing about this program is that it’s platform agnostic. Meaning it will run on Linux, Mac, & Windows.

It works utilizing two different methods of communication: Bluetooth sync to the computer or Wi-Fi. In my case, I used Wi-Fi since my home computer’s do not have Bluetooth.

How to get Remote Notifier for Android running:

  • Download and install the Remote Notifier for Android from the Android Market.
  • Go here to get the desktop half of the notification system.
    • To make things slightly easier for my Ubuntu friends: 32bit | 64bit
  • Install from the appropriate installer for your computer.
  • Run the desktop version.
  • Open the Android App and configure it according to your needs.

At this point, as long as both halves of the Notifier are running you should then begin receiving notifications immediately.

Android Market Link

Wanna Help Ubuntu?

Have you ever has that desire to help Ubuntu, but didn’t know how to do it? I know that I’ve always searched for ways to help out, but I’m and not a programmer by any means. I typically help out in the best ways I can..

Well, now there’s another way to help out. While this is not a new way of helping, it’s new to me. What is it?

Have you ever wondered where those screen shots come from in the Ubuntu Software Center (USC)? Who uploads them? Why are some so outdated? Well, they come from screenshots.debian.net. And guess what.. You can upload screenshots to them! All you have to do is follow their simple guidelines and submit a screenshot. If your screenshot is accepted, it will be available for all to see in the Ubuntu world!

What are the guidelines?

  • Screenshots are published under the terms of the packaged software itself.
  • Your screenshots must be in PNG format.
  • Due to legal reasons screenshots for non-free packages aren’t accepted.
  • Images larger than 800×600 pixels will automatically be reduced to that size (retaining the aspect ratio of course). So if you like to control the exact result of what you upload then make sure your image size is no larger than that.
  • Your screenshot should contain a typical scene when working with it. When snapshotting a browser load the debian.org home page. A screenshot of a graphics program should have a drawing loaded. Of a game please make a screenshot while you are playing and not of the start screen.
  • Nice tools for taking screenshots are shutter, ksnapshot (KDE), gimp, xwd or scrot. See the Debian wiki for more information on how to make screenshots under Debian.
  • You need not artificially switch off your window decorations.
  • Please set your language to english so that everybody understands it. If you don’t use english by default please start your application from a shell using after setting “export LANG=C”.
  • Please only take a screenshot of the respective application and not of your whole desktop (unless the screenshot is meant for a window manager).
  • Interlaced PNG files cannot be processed currently. Please use non-interlaced images.

Remember: your uploaded screenshot will not be visible immediately. It will first be checked by the admin team. It is already visible to you though.

It’s simple, easy, and allows you to help the FOSS world. Happy uploading!