Posts Tagged ‘docky’

How To | Use Docky Anchor to Change Docky Icons

In the past I talked about how a Docky user can change their Docky icons by navigating to the appropriate folder in Nautilus. Well, now I can take that one step further.

I’m going to show you how to use your Docky Anchor icon to navigate directly to that lovely Nautilus folder all with one click. For those of you that are worried that doing this might not allow you to open your Docky Settings, don;t worry. You will still be able to right-click on the Anchor and click Settings.

Step 1: GConf-Editor

  • Open your gconf-editor by navigating to Applications > System Tools > Configuration Editor (or gconf-editor in your terminal)
  • Navigate to /apps/docky-2/Docky/Items/DockyItem/
  • Change DockyItemCommand to gksu nautilus /usr/share/applications
  • Close GConf-Editor

Step 2: Change your Icons

  • Click on your Docky Anchor
  • Type in your password
  • Navigate to the program icon you would like to change

How To | Install Docky Stacks

Install Stacks in Docky with one command

The script automatically fetches and installs the files needed to both install and successfully run Docky with Stacks.

Open a terminal and enter the following line carefully:

wget href="http://www.panticz.de/sites/default/files/Docky/compile.docky.stacks.sh.txt -O - | bash -

 

 


Click here to see the original article and the source code of the bash script.

How To | Setup Gimpbox

In the past I’ve talked about my love for Gimp. I was one of those that felt a bit sad to hear that it would no longer be added by default in Ubuntu. Well, now there is more reason to love it!

There has been talks for a while now that the next major release of Gimp would allow users that ability to a single window version instead of the traditional 3-windowed version that is available now. Well, now people no longer have to wait for the official release to get their hands on this functionality! Enter…Gimpbox.

Gimpbox is simply a script that resides in your /bin folder and executes a single-window effect with your current Gimp. The installation of this script is extremely simple and can be executed by even the more novice of users. Here’s how to set up your Gimpbox:

Step 1: Open a terminal. Applications > Accessories > Terminal

Step 2: Copy/Paste this bit of code in to the terminal and press enter. This will download the script to the correct folder.

sudo wget http://gimpbox.googlecode.com/hg/gimpbox.py -O /usr/local/bin/gimpbox

Step 3: Copy/Paste this next bit of code in to the terminal and press enter. This will set the permissions on the script to execute properly.

sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/gimpbox

Step 4: Now that the script is in the correct location, we need to ensure that Gimp correctly recognizes the script. To do this we have to edit the Gimp entry in your Applications Menu. This is quite simple really.

  • Right-click on ‘Applications’
  • Click on ‘Graphics’ in the left hand pane
  • Highlight ‘GIMP Image Editor’ and click on the ‘Properties’ button
  • Replace the word ‘gimp’ with ‘gimpbox’

Now you’re all done! Just go to Applications > Graphics > Gimp Image Editor and open the program. You will see Gimp load and then after a second or two, all three of the traditional Gimp windows will be converter to a single-window style. :)

NOTE: If you’re having trouble running this please ensure you have python-wnck installed.

sudo apt-get install python-wnck


BONUS: If you’re like me and you launch your Gimp from Docky, you will notice that simply editing the launch command in the Applications menu does not launch Gimpbox from Docky. Here is the work around for this:

Step 1: Open Nautilus with root privileges and go to /usr/share/applications and locate Gimp.

gksu nautilus /usr/share/applications

Step 2: Right-click on Gimp and change the launch command to gimpbox %u

Your Gimpbox will now launch correctly from Docky. :D

sudo wget http://gimpbox.googlecode.com/hg/gimpbox.py -O /usr/local/bin/gimpbox

How To | Customize Your Docky

I’ve made it known in the past that I’m a Docky user. I love my Docky, and everything about it. Here are some ways that Docky users can customize their settings to spice things up a bit. Thank you to OMG! Ubuntu for making me aware of these tips.

1. Blur the dock background

  1. Open up Compiz-Config-Settings-Manager from the System > Preferences menu
  2. Enable ‘Blur’ by checking the box next to the icon
  3. Now click on the blur icon to enter the blur config area
  4. Here you want to add Docky to the list of ‘Alpha blur windows’. Use either the ‘grab’ method (by clicking the green cross) or by manually adding ‘class=Docky’ to the entry field.

File:Docky.png

2. Add more themes

Download one of the themes below, click the Anchor icon followed by the ‘Install theme’ button and locate the .tar file. The new themes will be available for use.

3. Change the urgent color glow

The color of the alert ‘glow’ used to notify you that a dock item wants your attention is also configurable. To change it:

  1. Press Alt + F2
  2. Type “gconf-editor” (without the quotes)
  3. Navigate to: apps > docky-2 > Docky > DockController
  4. Experiment with finding a color that suits you by changing the UrgentHue value to a number between -180 to 180. The default is 150.

4. Launch any application using the Anchor icon

You can set the Docky Anchor icon to launch any application you like. Here’s how: -

  1. Press ALT + F2 together
  2. Type “gconf-editor” (without the quotes)
  3. Navigate to: apps > docky-2 > Docky > Items > DockyItem
  4. Enter a command in the DockyItemCommand field to launch a specific application/action.

For example to launch the Gnome Control Centre when clicking on the Anchor enter:

gnome-control-center”

5. Learn how to make themes

You know you want to…I know I want to! There can never be too many themes for Docky. To learn how to make a theme visit wiki.go-docky.com/index.php?title=Theme_Specification. When you have a completed theme, add them to gnome-look.org. :-)

Finally…

If by the end of all that you’re not ready to end your Docky High…you can download this cool Docky inspired wallpaper made by ~ebupof.

docky_1280_4

For more Docky tips, information and answers to common questions you can head over to the Docky Wiki: wiki.go-docky.com

Gnome DO | Docky

Since almost day one of my Linux experience, I’ve loved the idea of having a Mac-like dock at the bottom of my screen. I’ve never really been fond of the Windows-like panel that comes by default. The first dock that I used was Avant Window Navigator and I was very happy with it, and I still think that it’s an awesome dock. However, I decided that it was time for a change.

Enter Docky.

Docky is a dock that is actually a theme used by Gnome DO. In my personal opinion, it looks and feels more like the Mac dock than AWN does. It’s been a great dock to use lately, however there are couple of cons:

  • Difficult to change program icons.
  • Does not allow for custom launchers (if it does, please enlighten me.)

I have finally learned how to edit the icons that appear for programs in Docky.

Disclaimer: This requires opening Nautilus as root. Please be very careful that you do not hurt your computer while doing this. If you follow the steps here, your computer will be fine.

Open a terminal and type in this:

gksudo nautilus

This will open Nautilus as root. Please navigate to:

/usr/share/applications

Now locate the program that you would like to change the icon of. Right click on it and open it’s properties. Change the icon. Close Docky completely and open it again. You should now see your preferred icon.


EDIT: Since writing this post I’m no longer using Gnome DO | Docky. I was feeling a bit limited by it and wanted something with more functionality. That’s when I discovered Docky! No, you’re not reading this wrong and I didn’t mistype. I’m using Docky.

The creator of Docky split from the Gnome Do project to do their own thing. In the process of this, the functionality of Docky has grown tremendously! If you look at my March screenshot, you will see that I have two docks. One at the bottom that houses all m programs. One of the left that houses all my Nautilus locations and mounted drives.

Check it out, you’ll love it.

Docky

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