Archive for May, 2010

ImageShack Uploader

In the past, when I needed to host pictures somewhere, I would always use Photobucket. However, in the last 6 months, they have made it quite clear, that they will no longer be supporting Linux.

I don’t like that…I have since moved to a more Linux friendly image host, ImageShack.

Not only does ImageShack support Linux, they have their ImageShack Uploader available for use in Linux. AND IT’S NATIVE GTK! I have been using it and I quite like it. However, it can be a pain in the butt to install for us 64Bit users. The .DEB will allow you to install the software, but if you run it through the terminal, you will see that the program segment faults. The reason that this is happening is because the scripting is looking for 32Bit libraries, not 64Bit. Here’s how we fix this.

First you will need to get a program called getlibs.

http://frozenfox.freehostia.com/cappy/getlibs-all.deb

Next you will need to run this command in the terminal:
getlibs /usr/bin/imageshack-uploader

At this point, you should be able to run the ImageShack Uploader.

How To | Fix Firefox Speed Issues (Ubuntu 10.04)

Open your Firefox and type about:config in the address bar and hit enter. To make a False into True, select the line to change, right click on the “value”. Select Toggle or Modify

  • network.http.pipelining > True
  • network.http.pipelining.maxrequests > 8 or 10
  • network.http.proxy.pipelining > True
  • network.dns.disableIPv6 > True
  • network.http.version* > 1.1
  • network.http.proxy.version* > 1.1

*Your system may already have this setting as default, but it’s worth checking, since pipelining only works on http 1.1 connections.

Credit goes to UbuntuGeek.com and user Brian T

How To | Fix the Big and Ugly Plymouth Logo

UPDATE: Please see the newest rendition of this fix. Much simpler and faster. :)

http://wp.me/pR93c-8D

 


 

 

Note: The instructions provided here are created for beginners in Linux. There is no need to use the terminal. The first fix was developed by Hoa Nguyen from the Ubuntu community & Softpedia. All credits go to them! All I am doing is passing on the information that works for me. Enjoy!

Step 1: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

sudo apt-get install v86d

…a terminal window will appear. Enter your password when asked, hit the Enter key and wait for the package to be installed. The terminal window will automatically close!

Step 2: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

gksu gedit /etc/default/grub

…enter your password when asked and hit the Enter key.

- Replace the following line (line number 9):

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"

with this one:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nomodeset video=uvesafb:mode_option=1280x1024-24,mtrr=3,scroll=ywrap"

- Replace the following line (line number 18):

#GRUB_GFXMODE=640x480

with this one:

GRUB_GFXMODE=1280x1024

The file should look like this:

Save the file and close it!

Step 3: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

gksu gedit /etc/initramfs-tools/modules

When the text window appears, add the following line at the end of the file:

uvesafb mode_option=1280x1024-24 mtrr=3 scroll=ywrap

It should look like this:

Save the file and close it!

Step 4: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

echo FRAMEBUFFER=y | sudo tee /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/splash

…a terminal window will appear for a second or two. The terminal window will automatically close!

Step 5: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

sudo update-grub2

…a terminal window will appear. Enter your password when asked, hit the Enter key and wait for the command to finish. The terminal window will automatically close!

Step 6: Hit the ALT+F2 key combination, paste the following command and check the “Run in terminal” option:

sudo update-initramfs -u

…a terminal window will appear. Enter your password when asked, hit the Enter key and wait for the command to finish. The terminal window will automatically close!

Step 7: Reboot your computer. When the system starts, you should see a better looking Ubuntu logo!

Note: You can play a little with the resolution of the first fix, as 1280×1024 may not work for everyone! Just make sure that you change it in all three locations as indicated above.

Note 2: Check out this thread at the Ubuntu Forum for a possible faster solution.

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1498221

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